The Aloni House. Antiparos island, Greece. A Representative Example of Camouflage Architecture.

 

When I firstly started my reaserch about camouflage architecture in the Cyclades I, honeslty, believed that I had the most brilliant and rare idea to develope and present in my thesis. As time was going by though, I  couldn’t help but realize that the subject of transparent architecture in rural contexts (especially the Cyclades) was not very rare, yet not old enough, too. Later, I would understand that a phenomenally very theoritical architectural problem would be an excellent start for exquisite, contemporary, yet traditional greek architecture.

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One of the many study cases I found on my way was the “Aloni House” in the picturesque island of Antiparos.

The design of the house is a dual response to the particular topography of the site and to the rural domestication techniques that in the past shaped the raw “Cycladic island” landscape. In the past, dry-rubble stone walls domesticated the land for agricultural purposes and were the most prominent man-made interventions in the landscape. The walls retained earth and transformed a steep topographyinto a series of arable plateaus.

Our site is a natural saddle where two slopes meet. Two long stone walls bridge the hills allowing the house to nestle in the space within while maintaining the continuity of the landscape which flows over it. This simple strategy blurs the edges of the house and makes its mass imperceptible within the broader skyline of the island.

 

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Photos: Erieta Attali, Ed Reeve, decaARCHITECTURE

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